• Staying Hydrated this Summer

    By Margaret Eich, MS, RDN

    We all know the importance of staying hydrated, but some of struggle more than others with this task. In the summer, it’s much easier to become dehydrated as we spend more time outside in the sun and heat. The Institute of Medicine recommends 91 oz (2.7 liters) fluids daily, and this requirement goes up to 100 oz (3 liters) during pregnancy. Of course, there are some variations in fluid needs based on body size with smaller bodies needing less fluid than larger bodies. These fluid requirements may seem high, but they include fluids from beverages and from food. About 80% of our fluid intake comes from beverages, so that means you should aim for about 72 oz fluid beverage when not pregnant and about 80 oz while pregnant. Monitoring the color of your urine and aiming for pale yellow urine is a good way to ensure you’re staying hydrated.  During the summer heat, we need to replace the fluids lost through sweating, so this further increases fluid needs.

    While trying to conceive or pregnant, our choices of fluids become somewhat more limited, as it’s best to avoid alcohol and caffeine. Of course, water is always a great choice, but understandably sometimes we want other options. Try these tips to stay hydrated this summer:

    • Focus on naturally caffeine-free beverages like water or water infused with fresh mint, cucumber, or fresh fruit.
    • Unsweetened coconut water is a great source of electrolytes and can be helpful for making mocktails.
    • Eat more soups and fresh fruits and vegetables, which naturally provide water.
    • As a substitute for alcohol, try drinking club soda or sparkling water with a splash of 100% fruit juice and a lemon or lime slice.
    • Instead of coffee or caffeinated tea, try unsweetened non-dairy milk like almond milk or flax milk with a little vanilla and/or cinnamon and/or cocoa powder. Add a teaspoon of honey or maple syrup for a little bit of sweetness.
    • Peppermint and ginger tea (and our ARTeas in-center!) are safe herbal tea choices for trying to conceive and during pregnancy.  Drink them hot or iced.
    • If you have trouble drinking enough fluids, try using a straw and take small sips throughout the day.
    • If you’re having trouble getting in enough fluids, it can also be helpful to track your fluid intake with an app, or simply by using a water bottle of known size. For example, if you have a 16 oz water bottle, if you drink 4.5 water bottles, then you’ll meet your 72 oz from beverages.
    • It can also be helpful to divide the day into 2 sections. For example, try getting in half of your water needs before 2 pm. If you haven’t met your first half of the day goal by 1:30 pm, it’s time to drink up. This can help you be more consistent with spreading your fluids out throughout the day.

    Book a Nutrition Consultation to learn more!  Try a Passport this summer and save!

  • To Grill or Not to Grill?

    by Elizabeth DeAvilla RD

    It’s finally (almost!) summer time, so you know what that means! Backyard BBQs with family and friends, picnics, and this dietitian’s favorite way to eat, alfresco! Many of us will turn to not only dining outside, but do cook our meals outside too, which means it’s time to fire up the grill. But before we do, let’s take a step back and make sure we’re still on the path to our optimal fertility.

    While we all know that certain foods may affect our fertility outcomes, one to definitely keep in mind, especially with our guys out there, is that of the correlation between some of the more commonly grilled foods, and that of semen quality. In a recent study published in 2017 processed red meat was negatively associated total sperm count in young healthy men. Organ meat (liver from beef, calf, pork, chicken, and turkey) consumers were reported as having more normal sperm.  Chicken however, did not relate to any sperm parameter in young men. So what does this all mean? The more processed meats, the worse off they are for our guys, chicken however, can have either no effect, while those organ meats can actually have a positive effect!

    Now let’s get to the more important question, how are we cooking that meat? Most commonly, especially in the nicer weather nights, you’ll find the guys all huddled around the grill and this is where is can get tricky. Research has shown that the consumption of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are chemicals considered to be “genotoxic” or highly damaging to our genetic material. Studies have shown that higher levels of PAHs in the urine are associated with poor sperm quality and cancer in men, and sadly, grilling is one of those cooking methods that can create them. This is formed from the combination of not only the amino acids from the meat, but the addition of sugars and an extremely high temperature (think open fire!)

    So does this mean I’m done with our Weber forever? No, no, don’t jump to any conclusions just yet.

    • While we don’t recommend grilling on a daily basis, once or twice a week is a much better option.
    • Consider adding a healthy vegetable, filled with those great antioxidants that can work to protect our cells and combat those nasty PAHs.
    • Discard the charred! When meat becomes charred, increased PAHs are found.
    • Control your temps while cooking. Many times, a drip of sauce or fat from the meat can cause a flare up of flame, this only raises the likelihood that PAHs will be formed.
    • Avoid smoking meats, which prolongs the cooking process and adds to the PAHs found in the prepared meats.

     

    Enjoy your summers, All! Try to keep those alfresco dinners healthy and fertility-friendly! 

    Want to learn more?  Meet with a nutritionist today! (Elizabeth is available Tuesday evenings and every other Saturday, while Robin is available on Wednesday evenings.) Questions?  Call us at: 312-321-0004!

    Dietary habits and semen parameters: a systematic narrative review

    1. Ricci-S. Al-Beitawi-S. Cipriani-A. Alteri-F. Chiaffarino-M. Candiani-S. Gerli-P. Viganó-F. Parazzini – Andrology – 2017

    Photo by Skitterphoto 

  • Summer Produce to Help Maximize Your Fertility

    By Margaret Eich, MS, RDN

    Now that late summer is here, the local produce is abundant. Visit your local farmer’s market for the best tomatoes of the year, and stock up on some raspberries and zucchini. These summer fruits and vegetables can help support your overall health and fertility. Check out some specific items to emphasize below:

    Summer Fruit: Berries pack a strong antioxidant punch and tend to be high on the priority list of farmer’s market shoppers. Watermelon, cherries, and peaches also grow here in the Midwest, and the juicy summer sweetness makes for great desserts without the added sugar.

    Broccoli and Kale: These cruciferous vegetables may help balance estrogen levels and contain important nutrients like calcium, folate, and vitamin C.

    Zucchini: Zucchini tends to be abundant and cheap at the farmer’s market. Use a spiralizer to make zoodles (zucchini “noodles”) and top with chicken or white beans, pesto, fresh tomatoes, and sautéed kale for a nutrient-rich summer meal.

    Herbs: Don’t forget the herbs like chives, cilantro, oregano, basil, and dill. Herbs are antioxidant-rich and thus may help to prevent free radical damage to eggs and sperm. Add any of these herbs to salads, salad dressings, or eggs for extra flavor. Use basil to make pesto or in Thai dishes with cilantro. Use cilantro in tacos or other Mexican dishes.

    Eggs: You can get some of the best eggs at the farmer’s market – the kind of eggs that come from chickens that have been running around eating bugs and vegetable scraps. These eggs have a deep orange yolk, due to higher levels of beta-carotene. Eggs are a healthy and nutrient-rich protein source and are great way to ensure you get enough protein at breakfast.

    Learn more about healthy exercise and nutrition while trying to conceive, during pregnancy, and beyond at the FREE Essential Fertility Fitness Tips on August 29th at 6pm and/or Lifestyle Hacks for PCOS on September 18th at 6pm! 

  • Keeping Your Fertility Friendly Eating Going During the Summer Months

    By Margaret Eich, MS, RDN

    It’s both easier and harder to eat healthy during the summer. Local fruits and vegetables are abundant, especially leafy and greens and berries, which are nutritional powerhouses. On the other hand, there are also lots of opportunities for less healthy options due to eating more meals out on vacations and attending more parties and barbecues.

    The key is not to take the enjoyment of these events, but to make choices that are consistent with your goals with the knowledge that there is no such thing as the perfect diet, and that it’s perfectly fine and normal to indulge sometimes. That being said, what’s the best way to handle events during the summer? Follow these tips, and see what you can apply to your life:

    Have a plan in mind for events or meals out. Often when we’ve decided ahead of time what we plan to eat, it goes better than when we make decisions in the moment. When eating out at restaurant, check the menu online ahead of time. At  other events, try to load up your half your plate with vegetables.

    Bring a healthy dish. Potlucks tend to be light on the veggies, so bring a veggie dish if you can. Alternatively, bring fruit or a healthy protein.

    Manage your appetite. Make sure you don’t arrive to restaurants, parties, or events ravenously hungry. When we’re overly hungry, it’s SO much harder to make healthier food choices, and it’s much easier to overeat.

    When you’re on vacation, rent a place with a kitchen. That way, you can prepare some of your own meals. Seek out a local farmers market for fruits and vegetables, and pick up some local fresh fish if you’re somewhere on the water. Make a point of prepping 1-2 meals per day where you’re staying, so that you can have healthier options and feel your best.

    On road trips, you use apps to find restaurants nearby. Using the signs on the freeway pretty much ensures you’ll be eating at fast food restaurants. Apps like Yelp will show you what restaurants are nearby, and you can even peruse menu from the car (not while you’re driving, of course) and get directions.

    Remember to keep it all in perspective. What you eat most of the time is what matters the most to your health and fertility. Eating also shouldn’t be a source of stress in our already stressful lives, so do your best and let the rest go. It’s ok and totally normal to indulge and eat more meals at restaurants on vacation. Choose healthier options most of the time, indulge sometimes, and eat until your satisfied, but not overly full, and make peace with your decisions without guilt.

     

    Looking for more ways to use your diet to positively impact your fertility or to fit healthy eating into your busy life, book a nutrition appointment today!