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  • How Stage IV Endometriosis forced me to find my voice

    My first period came in January 1998. I remember it like it was yesterday. I was in eighth grade and I remember saying the cruelest thing I have EVER said to my Mom. I cursed her for making me be born a girl. I still to this day feel awful for those words having left my mouth, as my Mom is the most amazing mother in the world. 

    In high school and college, I would pass out from the debilitating pain and friends, roommates, and loved ones many times would find me in the fetal position just trying to breathe through the pain. What I learned from an early age from classmates, girlfriends, and women in my life is that we as women experience painful periods and it’s just part of being a woman. We (women) all experience this excruciating pain. 

    I went on for the next 20 years thinking it was completely normal to feel stabbing pain for 2-4 days every 28 days. I learned quickly that heating pads and Ibuprofen were my best friend. I always felt that this pain was not normal, but nobody outside of my Mom truly understood and believed me. It was in college where I first learned about Endometriosis and thought, hey I think this is what this pain is all about. 

    From 2007-2018, I saw nine doctors. Most of the doctors I saw, all said similar things, “We’re women, we’re used to dealing with pain. Every woman has painful periods.” Unfortunately, there were only two doctors who truly listened and believed me when I said I think I have Endometriosis. I felt defeated and crazy. I thought all these doctors are telling me this is normal that I feel like I am being stabbed in my uterus each month. I must be making this pain up. I was just surviving month-to-month and most definitely not thriving. As women we have an incredible gift of intuition, so trust that, trust that you know your body better than anyone else. Don’t be afraid to speak up!

    My husband and I began our fertility journey 6 years ago. We tried naturally for 1½ years with no success. After 4 failed IUIs, 4 failed IVF transfers, and 3 miscarriages, I asked my doctor for more answers. She suggested two things: first was to do the Yoga for Fertility program with Beth Heller at Pulling Down the Moon. This was the first time I had been shown how to tune in and listen to my body in a supportive female community. I had never been so seen and loved within the fertility community. I have friends for life from that Yoga for Fertility program.

    Second, my doctor suggested I see an Endometriosis specialist. I had excision surgery in November 2018. My surgery should have taken a max of 1-2 hours, instead I woke up 6 hours later to hearing news from my husband. My husband said “I have good and bad news, which would you like to hear first?” I said, “I want the good news first”. He said, “you were right, you have stage IV Endometriosis and bad news it was so extensive they removed your left fallopian tube.” Even though this news was the worst case scenario with Endometriosis, it was a blessing in disguise. 

    Hearing I was right and in fact did have Endometriosis, was the best news I had received in 20 years. I had finally felt heard, seen, and my opinions were valued. This new information changed everything for me and my fertility doctors. My doctors could now move forward with adjusting my fertility medications and procedure process based on my Endometriosis diagnosis. 

    I know many would be angry having a body that made you feel debilitating pain every 28 days. However, I am incredibly grateful for my Endometriosis journey because it has forced me to find my voice and learn how to advocate for myself and my body. I have also been able to share this information with my nutritionist who can better assist me. It takes practice and time in silence to tune in with our bodies and listen to what it needs and craves. Remember, you are the ONLY one who knows your body inside and out and no one else will advocate as fiercely for you or your body the way that YOU can.

    About the author: Kasia has been a part of the PDTM community since March 2016. She has been trying to conceive for 6+ years, has had 5 failed IUIs, 7 failed IVF transfers, experienced 4 miscarriages, and has Stage IV Endometriosis. She is in the midst of her last and final IVF retrieval and transfer AND beginning her adoption and possible surrogacy journey. She is thriving as a Fertility Coach by empowering, supporting, and inspiring women on their fertility journeys. You can find her blog and contact information over at www.CoachingwithKasia.com

    Learn how Pulling Down the Moon can provide community and support on your journey!  Check our calendar for events today!

    Photograph by Anna Stidham

    Kasia S. McGuire

    Fertility Coach

    www.CoachingwithKasia.com

    Instagram: @KasiaSMcGuire

    Mobile: (773) 844-2117

    Email: CoachingwithKasia@gmail.com

  • Simple Ways to Boost Your Immunity Now!

    By Robin Miller, RDN

    Between influenza, the novel COVID-19, and other illnesses going around this time of year, it is a great time to incorporate some immune-boosting strategies into our daily lives. There are plenty of things we can do every day to enhance our immunity. Check out my recommendations below.

    -Eat your fruits and vegetables; at least 5/day, but the more you can consume the better! Choose a variety of different fruits and vegetable to incorporate into your daily diet, this will provide a more diverse microbiome, which is important to enhancing gut health and immunity! Try incorporating a spinach in your morning smoothie, antioxidant rich berries in your yogurt or an vitamin C rich orange as a part of your afternoon snack. 

    -Get plenty of sleep; aim for 7 to 9 hours a night. 

    -Keep your gut in check, eating a variety of high-fiber foods, including whole-grains, fruits and vegetables, legumes, root vegetables and fermented foods like sauerkraut and full-fat yogurt.  Be sure to incorporate a high-quality probiotic into your daily supplement regimen to support optimal gut and immune health! 

    -Incorporate daily movement; try to get your 10,000 steps in through walking or other forms of low-impact exercise such as swimming or yoga

    -Review your supplement regimen! There are many vitamins and minerals that are known to support immunity, such as vitamin C and D, Magnesium, Zinc and Selenium. Working with a Registered Dietitian is the best approach to ensure you are meeting your needs from a supplement standpoint. 

    -Reduce your overall stress; we know that chronic stress can wreak havoc on our bodies, particularly our hormones and inflammatory response. Try incorporating things like: acupuncture, yoga, less screen-time, and meditation to help combat stress. 

    To learn more about immune-boosting foods and supplements that are right for you, schedule a virtual nutrition consult today (available by phone or video conference) and work with one of our Registered Dietitians!  Our online shop is also available for your convenience for all your supplement needs while sheltering at home!

     

  • Fish Oil Supplementation to Improve Male Fertility

    By Robin Miller RDN

    Studies suggest that infertility affects approximately 15% of all couples, and although conventional wisdom suggests that infertility is a female issue, the reality is approximately 40% to 50% of fertility issues are due to male factors.  Much research suggests that a healthy diet rich in certain nutrients, such as omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants, other vitamins, specifically, vitamin D and folate, and low in saturated fat and trans–fat is associated with good semen quality. Fish, shellfish, other seafood, poultry, cereals, vegetables, fruits, low-fat dairy, and skim milk have been found to be positively associated with several semen parameters as well. Fish and fish liver oil in particular also contain other essential nutrients, that have been associated with better semen quality. With that said, there is now new research and data focused on the intake of fish oil supplements and testicular function as measured by semen quality and reproductive hormone levels. 


    After examining data from nearly 1,700 young men, researchers determined that fish oil supplementation was associated with a higher sperm count and improved levels of hormones, specifically lower FSH and LH levels; higher free testosterone to LH ratio that contribute to male fertility, according to the report published in JAMA Network Open. 

    However, the amount of fish oil the men in the study took was wide-ranging, so there is no specific quantity that can be suggested from this study. Furthermore, because it’s an observational study, we can’t assume a causal or contributing relationship between fish oil supplements and positive outcomes; a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study is the preferred method of research to support a positive correlation. 

    In the meantime, most everyone can benefit from more fish in our diets! Incorporate wild, organic, preferably low-mercury fish, such as wild salmon, shrimp, tilapia and whitefish to name a few, into your diet 1-2 a week. Try swapping out a deli meat sandwich with a tuna sandwich or a steak for a piece of wild salmon during the week and you will be naturally getting in some healthy fish oil along with tons of other nutrients, like vitamin D, iron, zinc and magnesium that support fertility. If fish is not your jam, try supplementing a high-quality fish oil supplement to achieve optimal benefits. 

    To learn more about ways to increase fish in your diet as well as find a fish oil supplement right for you, schedule a nutrition consult  today  and work with one of our Registered Dietitians!

    Reference: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2758861

     

  • Setting Goals vs. Resolutions

    By Robin Miller, RDN

    The beginning of a New Year is often synonymous for many with starting fresh, creating new goals and resolutions. In talking with family members, friends and clients it seems there is a common theme around goals and resolutions revolving around health and fitness whether it be healthy eating, cooking more and eating out less, exercising, and the list goes on.  Is it just me or does it seem that January and February are always the busiest time of year in gyms and fitness centers, as well as, well the produce aisle, where did all the kale go?! However, come the middle of February to beginning of March the gym rush seems to die down and the produce section seems much more bountiful. Why is this and how can we maintain those healthy habits year-round?

    Personally, I’ve never been one to make a year-long resolution or goal, the thought of promising to do something for an entire year is just daunting. I don’t want to promise myself “I won’t eat sweets for a year,” I am surely setting myself up for failure and overlooking the happy medium in achieving healthy habits. This is where weekly and/or monthly goal setting comes into play.

    Creating weekly or monthly goals can be much less daunting and actually seem doable. I encourage clients to have a few overall goals, but then create small goals every week or month to ultimately make progress towards hitting those goals. The small goals may change depending on what is going on in your life on a weekly or monthly basis, by making these modifications you are still able to make forward progress towards the ultimate goal(s). 

    For example, you may have a goal around cooking more and eating out less. A weekly goal one week may be to cook four meals and then the following week this may change to cooking two meals vs. four because of work commitments, etc. Allowing for these modifications to goals not only sets you up for greater success, but also helps to create a long-term habit. 

    If you haven’t had success in achieving your year-long, New Year’s resolution, perhaps the idea of weekly or monthly goals will resonate with you.  I challenge you to start by picking three, doable goals for the week! Try a yoga class, schedule a massage for yourself, go to a free informational event to support your journey!  If your goals revolve around nutrition, schedule a nutrition consult  today and work with one of our Registered Dietitian to develop an individualized plan to help you achieve your fertility, prenatal, postpartum, condition-specific, and/or health goals! 

     

  • Nutrition Goal Setting in 2020

    By Margaret Eich, MS, RDN

    The New Year always feels like a fresh start, and it’s a time of transition where it makes sense to reflect on the previous year and set goals for the coming year. New Year’s resolutions around health and fitness tend to get a bad rap, because people often have a hard time following through on these resolutions. One reason for this is that these resolutions tend to be too hard or are too vague.

    One thing that I think is really helpful is to be very specific about what we want to achieve. Sometimes we make very non-specific goals such as “lose weight,” or “eat healthier,” or  “be more organized.” (No judgment here, as I am definitely guilty of this.) It’s important to be specific with your goals, so you know when you have achieved them. The other big piece of this is breaking down the goal into the habits that you need to incorporate into your life in order to achieve those goals.  It’s our daily habits that really determine whether or not we meet the goals we set out to achieve. Follow these tips when thinking about goal setting in 2020:

    1) Be specific about the goal. Instead of “get healthier,” or “lose weight,” try “sleep for at least 8 hours 5 nights out of the week,” or “exercise for 30 minutes 5 days per week.” Being really specific helps you stay on track and know when you’re making progress towards your goal and when you need to tweak your habits to make progress.

    2) Break the goal down logistically. If your goal is to sleep 8 hours per night, then what do you need to do to make that happen? Maybe you need to be in bed by 10 pm, so that means you need to get help from a partner in making sure to get all of your obligations done earlier, so that you have some time to wind down and be ready to sleep at 10 pm. It also might mean prepping breakfast and lunch the night before, so that you don’t have to get up as early to do it.

    Weight loss is a common goal, so if that is your goal, it’s important to think about the habits that you need to cultivate to meet your goal. Some examples of habits you might choose to work on over the course of they year might be: fill half my plate with non-starchy vegetables at lunch and dinner. Eat protein with all my meals and snacks. Bring healthy snacks to work, so that I’m less tempted by office treats and so that I don’t arrive home overly hungry looking to raid the fridge. (We’ve all been there!) Eat mindfully – put away the phone, turn off the TV, and move away from your computer in order to truly experience my food. These habits are likely too much to work on all at once, but having a list of 1-2 habits to work on at a time will help you start to make progress toward your goal.

    3) Prepare, prepare, prepare. When changing your eating habits, it’s important to think back on what has worked well for you in the past and what hasn’t. This can help set you up for success by not repeating the same things that have tripped you up in the past.

    In addition, think about the challenges you’ve had in the past – social gatherings, eating out, family meals, travel? Spend some time thinking about your unique challenges, and map out a plan ahead of time. It’s really hard to navigate challenging situations when we haven’t prepared ahead of time. Things don’t always go according to plan, but you have a better chance of eating in a way that makes you feel good if you plan ahead.

    4) Don’t be afraid to change course. Be gentle with yourself in assessing what’s working and what’s not working. You may start out with specific habits you’re working on, and they may turn out to be too hard based on the current season of your life. That’s ok. Reassess, change or scale back the habits and keep going. It can be really tempting to fall into all-or-nothing thinking, in which if we have a rough day or week, we completely abandon the goal. Our progress is determined by what we do most of the time, not by what we do sometimes. The important part is to get back on track and keep going.

    Need some help navigating changes to your eating habits and lifestyle to support your fertility or pregnancy in 2020? Make a nutrition appointment today!  Get started and save with our monthly special today!

  • Choline: An Update on a Vital Fertility and Pregnancy Nutrient

    By Margaret Eich, MS, RDN

    Choline is little talked about essential nutrient for fertility and pregnancy. It is not technically considered a vitamin, as our bodies can synthesize choline though not enough to meet our daily needs.  Choline is a major component of all cell membranes and is a precursor to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which is involved in muscle control and memory. Choline is also converted to betaine, which prevents homocysteine levels from becoming elevated. Elevated homocysteine has been associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and miscarriage. Choline deficiency may also play a role in the development of fatty liver, as choline is necessary to transport fat from the liver to other tissues in the body.

    Choline also has important functions during pregnancy. Choline is essential for baby’s brain development and for DNA methylation, meaning that choline deficiency can have epigenetic effects on the developing baby. There is also evidence that adequate choline intake helps prevent neural tube defects like spinal bifida, which most people associate only with folate/folic acid intake. 

    Several studies have compared intakes of 480 mg choline daily to 930 mg choline daily at varying times during pregnancy and found a variety of outcomes. For example, supplementation with 930 mg choline compared to 480 mg throughout the 3rd trimester resulted in faster information processing in 4-13 month old infants. In a similar study, children whose mothers took in 930 mg choline daily performed better with a color location memory task compared to children whose mothers who had only taken in 480 mg choline daily. Another study reported reduced attention and behavior problems and social withdrawal in children at 40 months of age in the group of mothers supplemented with 900 mg choline from the 2nd trimester through delivery in addition to baby being supplemented with 100 mg choline daily through 3 months of age compared to controls.

    The daily requirement for choline for non-pregnant women of childbearing age is 425 mg. This goes up 450 mg during pregnancy and further increases to 550 mg during breastfeeding. Less than 10% of pregnant women are meeting their daily requirement for choline, underscoring the importance of focusing on this nutrient.

    The impact of choline during pregnancy is an emerging area of research, and currently it seems that 450 mg choline at a minimum is needed to support a healthy pregnancy, but up 900-930 mg is safe and may have long-term benefits to the baby. Animal products are better sources of choline than plant foods–with liver and egg yolks being the best sources–followed by meat and fish and cruciferous vegetables.

    Because so few women are meeting even basic daily choline needs during pregnancy, taking a prenatal vitamin that contains choline is a good idea, especially if you are a vegetarian or vegan. Pulling Down the Moon carries two prenatal vitamins, both of which contain choline. TheraNatal OvaVite contains 100 mg choline, and PlusOne contains 450 mg choline. Do you have more questions about optimal choline intake prior to and during a pregnancy? Book a nutrition appointment today!

     

      

     

  • Simplifying the Best Diet for Fertility

    By Robin Miller RDN

    There seems to be so much information out there about diets and foods to consume and not consume while trying to conceive and during pregnancy. But what really is the best diet when it comes to fertility? 

     

    We know that food likely plays a role in fertility and our ability to conceive, but is there a specific diet per se, that will lead to pregnancy? Unfortunately, it’s not that simple, however the research does suggest that including specific food groups and foods, while eliminating others can increase chances of pregnancy.

    One recent study* showed that couples undergoing IVF, in vitro fertilization, had almost three times the chance of a successful pregnancy when they closely adhered to the Mediterranean Diet, which is consists on a high intake of whole grains, nuts, seeds, fruits and vegetables and a low intake of red meat. Let’s dig deeper and look at specific foods to include in our daily diets to help improve overall fertility.

    1. Berries:  strawberries, blueberries, raspberries and blackberries are filled with antioxidants that limit inflammation in the body as well as protect our cells from aging and environmental damage.  
    2. Cruciferous Vegetables:  broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, collards, kale, kohlrabi, mustard greens, turnip greens, turnips and rutabaga.  These vegetables contain a compound called indole-3-carbinol that regulates estrogen metabolism and helps convert “bad estrogens” into good ones.
    3. Healthy Fats:  The fats we eat play a very important role in fertility.  They are incorporated into our cell membranes (think egg and sperm) and make up the backbone of many important molecules in our body.   Monounsaturated fats help to lower levels of harmful LDL cholesterol and are found in olive oil, avocado and most nuts.  Omega-3 fats are key to lowering the level of inflammation in our body and are found in fatty fish, dark leafy vegetables, walnuts, chia and flax seeds.  
    4. Beans/Lentils:  Besides being a good source of protein, beans and lentils contain soluble fiber, which helps bind excess hormones and remove them from the body.
    5. Whole Grains:  Whole grains are a rich source of fiber and B-vitamins.  B-vitamins are crucial for optimal egg development and ovulation. 
    6. Lean Protein:  Choose lean proteins like organic chicken, turkey, grass-fed red meats, and organically raised eggs.  

    To learn more about specific foods and food groups to include in a fertility-friendly diet and improve your overall nutrition; schedule a nutrition consult online here or call us to learn more at: 312-321-0004 today!

    *https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29390148

  • Featuring a New Supplement: PlusOne Prenatal Vitamin

    By Robin Miller, RDN

    It can be a very overwhelming process when you are selecting a prenatal vitamin. Many questions probably come to mind such as, what should be I be looking for in a prenatal vitamin? Which nutrients should I focus on? Which one is right for me?  And so many more. 

    Here at Pulling Down the Moon, we are making that process seamless for you. We have already done the legwork and evaluated many supplements, including prenatal supplements. Our team of registered dietitians can help you to determine which supplements are right for you.  

    We are excited to feature a new, comprehensive prenatal supplement option we have available for sale in Chicago, Highland Park, and via our online shop for your convenience! 

    PlusOne Daily Prenatal packets contain vitamins and minerals to support women during preconception through nursing and postpartum. Here are some of the highlights of what these packets contain to support your fertility journey.

    • Deeper dive: This rock-star prenatal Vitamin: contains 1mg methylfolate to support fetal neurological health as well as antioxidants including vitamins C, E, and beta-carotene, and ample B-vitamins to support women vulnerable to B-depleting conditions like birth control pill use and emotional stress. 

     

    • In addition, ach packet contains high quality omega-3 fatty acids, specifically 1 g DHA to support fetal brain development and 670 mg EPA to support the body’s anti-inflammatory response, healthy cell membranes and mood. 

     

    • Fetal brain development support: Each packet contains 450 mg of Choline, which is an essential nutrient for brain development. Choline may also play a role in healthy genetic expression in early embryo development. 

     

     Be sure to check out our Cyber Monday promotion, 20% off on PlusOne Prenatal available for purchase via our online shop!  

     

  • Our Favorite Fertility-Friendly Holiday Recipes

     

     

     

     

    Healthier Hot Chocolate

    This hot chocolate is rich in antioxidants and very low in sugar compared to most hot chocolate mixes and those you can buy in coffee shops. 

    1 tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder

    10 oz hot water

    ½ teaspoon vanilla

    1-2 teaspoona real maple syrup

    ¼ cup whole milk or non-dairy milk 

    sprinkle of cinnamon (optional)

    Add cocoa powder to a mug. Add hot water, vanilla, maple syrup, and milk, and stir to mix. Sprinkle with cinnamon. Enjoy!

     

    Faux Latte

    When you’re avoiding caffeine, this still feels like a nice treat without the excess sugar.

    1 cup of milk or unsweetened non-dairy milk (I recommend cashew or flaxmilk for better flavor)

    ½ teaspoon vanilla

    1-2 teaspoons real maple syrup

    Sprinkle of cinnamon (optional)

     

    Heat milk until hot and use a handheld milk frother to froth the milk. Add vanilla, maple syrup, and cinnamon (if using). Stir to mix. Enjoy!

     

    Red Cabbage Slaw with Candied Pecans


    The gentle sweetness of the pecans nicely balances the flavor of the red cabbage. This is a great salad to make on Sunday and eat throughout the week. It’s also great for parties and potlucks.

    ¾ cup candied pecans (see recipe below)

    ½ medium head or 1 small head of red cabbage
    juice of 1 lemon
    ¼ cup olive oil

     

    Make the candied pecans first following the recipe below. While the pecans are cooling, cut the core out of the red cabbage and shred using the food processor shred attachment. You can also finely chop my hand. Finely chop the pecans, and add to the cabbage and stir until evenly distributed. Add lemon juice and olive oil, and stir until cabbage is coated with dressing. Store in the refrigerator. Enjoy!

     

    Candied Pecans

    This delicious treat is great for adding to salads or eating on their own as a snack. They have just a light coating of coconut oil and maple syrup, making them a healthier option than most candied pecans.


    Makes ¾ cup candied pecans

    1 teaspoon coconut oil
    ¾ cup raw pecan halves
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon maple syrup

     

    Heat coconut oil over medium heat in a small pot until melted. Add pecans and stir to coat pecans with coconut oil. Sprinkle salt onto pecans. Add maple syrup, and mix to coat pecans in maple syrup. Immediately remove from heat. (If you leave the pecans on the hot burner, they will likely burn.)

     

    Pumpkin Pie 

    Instead of the traditional white flour crust, this pumpkin pie has a delicious crust made from pecans, dates, and coconut oil. This drastically reduces the refined carbohydrate content. The filling is lightly sweetened with maple syrup, for a healthier spin on a holiday favorite. 

     

     

     

     

    Makes one 9-inch pie 

     

    Crust

    ⅓ cup pitted dates (about 8 deglet noor dates) 

    1½ cups pecans


    2 tablespoons coconut oil 

     

    Filling

    15 oz. can of pumpkin or about 1-3⁄4 cup cooked pumpkin 

    ½ cup canned coconut milk
 or whole milk

    ½ cup maple syrup


    ½ teaspoon salt


    1 teaspoon cinnamon


    ½ teaspoon ginger


    ¼ teaspoon nutmeg


    ⅛ teaspoon cloves


    2 large eggs 

     

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Process dates, pecans, and coconut oil in the blender or food processor until mixture is well-blended and sticks to the side of the food processor – about 30-60 seconds. Press mixture into a 9-inch pie pan and set aside. 

    In a medium bowl, combine all filling ingredients, and whisk until well-mixed. Pour into pecan-date crust. Bake at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes, or pumpkin filling appears custard-like and crust is lightly browned. Allow to cool before serving. Store in the refrigerator. 

     

  • Tips to Feel your Best During the Holidays

    By Margaret Eich, MS, RDN

    This time of year onslaught of sweets seems to start with Halloween and doesn’t end until New Year’s resolutions. We like to talk a lot about adjusting your food environment to set you up for success by only keeping fruits and vegetables on the counter at home, for example. It also helps to keep tempting foods that you’d rather not eat out of your house. This tends to get more challenging as food treats abound around the holidays, and if it’s not at home, the treats are in full force at work or at holiday gatherings. By no means do I mean to imply we shouldn’t have any treats around the holidays. It’s really fun to have the treats that only come around once a year. Where we can run into trouble is when instead of having those treats on a few holidays, we end up eating these foods that make us feel sluggish and aren’t consistent with our long-term goals consistently over a 1-month or longer time period.

    Here are some tips to try to keep your eating around the holidays as healthy as possible:

    1. Stock your house with seasonal fruits and vegetables. Now is the time for delicious citrus and pomegranates and Brussels sprouts to name a few. Enjoy these healthy nutrient and antioxidant rich foods as part of daily eating, but they also work great incorporated into holiday meals.

     

    1. Try nuts in the shell, like walnuts. Nuts in the shell become more widely available in grocery stores. If you haven’t tried nuts in the shell, they often taste so much fresher than shelled nuts, such that they taste like a real treat! Plus it takes time to crack and remove the shell from nuts, which helps us eat more slowly and mindfully.

     

    1. Make dishes with butternut and acorn squash. These winter squashes are nutrient-rich and are lower in carbs than regular potatoes. There’s nothing wrong with having some regular potatoes. It’s just that white potatoes tend to dominate our plates along with other starchy dishes at holiday meals. Winter squashes are also rich in fiber, vitamin E, folate, and beta-carotene.

     

    1. Eat mindfully. Work on eating slowly and checking in with your hunger and fullness cues before and while eating. Avoid distractions like your computer, cell phone, or TV, as we often eat more when we aren’t focused on the eating experience.

     

    1. Avoid eating sweets on an empty stomach. Save sweets for after meals or after a satisfying snack with protein. You’ll be less likely to overeat sweets that way, and your blood sugar will rise more slowly such that you can avoid being on a blood sugar roller coaster.

    6. Don’t skimp on sleep. It can be tempting to sleep less when we’re so busy, but less sleep often leads to overeating and more difficulty making healthy     choices.

    What to learn more? Book a nutrition consult today!  Get support and save this month on an Initial Nutrition Consultation, Initial Acupuncture Consultation, Fertility-Enhancing Massage, or Yoga for Fertility series with the $99 Wild Card!